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20121120
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next few years. host: founder and executive editor of the hagstrom report. thank you for joining us this morning. hohost: let's look at one last story. the former senator died overnight according to union leader.com. he had been ill for a considerable time and was instrumental in the appointment by president george h. w. bush by david sutter. before his retirement, he was associated with the law firm in new hampshire. the story points out that he was born back in 1930 and served in the united states senate from 1980 until 1993. he was asked to replace the treasury secretary by president clinton but he declined. that headline from the new hampshire a union leader. we will see you tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. here on the washington journal. until then, have a good day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ♪ >> here is what is coming up on the c-span network. live at noon on c-span, a discussion on the challenges in the middle east and united states foreign policy. speakers at the woodrow wilson center in could robe
and the press. if i use the word twilight to suggest that network news, as we have known it, is on its way out and as something new is emerging. whether what is new will satisfy the urgent needs of our democracy cannot be noted at this time. let's hope that it will. without a free and occasionally rambunctious media, we will not be living in an open society. the free press and an open society are intimately linked, one dependent on the other. network news -- if network news is in its twilight, then perhaps our democracy is facing a turning point as well. i asked an old colleague and a friend, ted koppel, to discuss the changes in network news and what those changes might mean for our society. ted is known best for his 25 years of anchor and host of nightline, but he has also been a foreign correspondent, a war correspondent, and author, and he has covered many political campaigns. i shared something in preparing with this -- for this program. i ran into the following interesting thought. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more th
, broadcast news has been outflanked and overtaken by scores of other media options. help us understand the perceived need for these changes because they not only affect the quality of network news, by the way, do you agree with me that it is in the twilight zone a? >> it is in a twilight. but remember, twilight is usually followed by night and then don follows night. i am still hopeful. you know, it is not going to stay this way forever. i think, you know, what tends to happen in this country as you and i have observed over the last 50 or 60 years, we tend to go too far to the right, and then we correct course and passed through the middle and go too far to the left, and then we correct course again i think what is happening to broadcast journalism requires a course correction. as we come to realize that our educational system is not as good as we like to believe, that our health care system is not as good as we like to believe, that we are spending -- i mean, there are so many things that are on the brink of taking us into real disaster. not the least of them being the possibility of
that the employer can use. now, i grant this isn't just a skills training program, but you've got to know how to write, to speak, to think. and i think a lot of our problem is that we graduate many students that don't necessarily do that well. and if the humanity majors, and they do not do that especially well, then they have got trouble. so, and they can't necessarily prove they do those things will. earlier someone said, i think you, jim, talked about the need for computer skills. my guess is that if the humanities majors, major really helped some sort of certification, that showed certain skills. i think that we haven't fully grappled with how to deal with our desire, our feeling that we need to have the humanities as a critical part of the university, we need to have the numbers, students take these. we believe that but we haven't grappled with how we can get these folks jobs. they are not going to get at the big corporations and less they have very good grades. and we can't necessarily, so far, it's not easy for them to establish they have the skills, especially if they don't have those
apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a very important role in this. it can exert a tremendous amount of leverage on the israelis to avoid a ground invasion of the gaza strip. while the u.s. does believe that israel has a right too defend itself there is a widening belief here among many, this is what is being communicated to the u.s. by egyptian officials, that a ground invasion and further military escalation will not solve this. we've been down this road before. >> go ahead, ayman. if you're still there. >> i'm still here. i was saying that they've been down this road before, used the military option back in 2008, and previously it hasn't solved the gaza problem and so many people are saying that this has to stop. to really think of a new paradigm shift in how to solve the crisis in gaza and the larger with the israeli/palestinian conflict. >> yesterday we were talking about the americans passively having too light a footprint in the region, against the back
asia for a regional summit this opened the door to the first u.s. presidential visits to myanmar and cambodia. secretary of state hillary clinton was also there until just moments ago, when she departed for the middle east at the president's request. for more on that, political director and , chuck todd. >> reporter: it's fair to say the events in gaza have overshadowed what the president's been working on here in southeast asia. i can tell you this, last night cambodia time, the president was on the phone until 2:30 in the morning basically doing shuttle diplomacy first with egyptian president morsi and then netanyahu and then back on the phone with morsi. the reason there, obviously, talking to netanyahu getting a sense of what it would take to prevent him from doing the ground invasion into gaza. the talks with morsi are about, this is the egyptian leader, has the direct contacts with hamas. neither united states or israel has that. the decision to send secretary clinton i'm told by white house aides is neither an acknowledgment things are close neither do they feel things got
clearly before us, the reality is these people are kvetching, they're belly aching -- >> i like the yiddish. >> they're incapable of understanding what's going on with the broader agenda of america democracy and here is the real deal. people with far less do far better and far more with what they have than those who have a whole bunch. even if the bible that they love to quote, jesus said those who have been given stuff and can't make use of it will have what little they have taken away from them. the reality is the republicans had an enormous universe of affection and goodwill given to them by people who actually don't even share their interests. the 47% that mitt romney was beating up on, a lot of these people voted for him. a lot of white women voted for mitt romney. a lot of the people in the red states voted for mitt romney and received the benefits. what are you complaining about? you're complaining about your mirror. shatter the mirror, look out into the real world, look through the window of reality that most of us have to grapple with, and then you get closer and more i
end on an upward trajectory, getting the best possible people around him as confederates in the u.s. senate, strong ministers in the cabinet around him. go for it, mr. president. good isn't great. great is great. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politicsnation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead -- still conservative after all this year. governor romney spent the whole gop primary season catering to the right, telling immigrants to self-deport, bragging that he'd get rid of planned parenthood, saying he'd cut everyone's taxes. so, how did that work out for him? here's how mr. romney was recently spotted pumping his own gas in california. no secret service, no advisers, and no words on whether he used regular or premium. romney thought he'd be on the road to the white house by now. instead, he's just on the road. meanwhile, the president is heading home on air force one after meeting with world leaders. he didn't pump the gas for that plane. here's the point. elections have consequences. the american p
president of egypt being the prime mover here, pressured by the u.s., but bringing together all sides? i'm not sure that ayman can hear us. we have a satellite delay. can we talk about the diplomacy from the standpoint of hamas and the muslim brotherhood? >> yeah. andrea, these talks have been now under the auspices of the egyptian government but more specifically under the au spis sis of intelligence officials. they can meet with israel and the palestinian factions. it's unlikely that president m mahmoud morsi was going to sit down with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some poi
the world today. that does it for us tonight. we'll see you tomorrow night. thanks for being with us. >> well i am stunned. >> mitt romney, kick him when he's done. >> did you see the sunday shows yesterday? >> hitting their nominee. >> we have to show we're sere serious. we have to like them first. >> we would never talk like that. >> there's not a lot of people defending mitt romney. >> when you're in a hole, stop digging. he keeps digging. >> newt gingrich, i think it's nuts. >> they have to do something. >> we have the fiscal cliff. >> the cliff. >> the cliff. >> whatever that means exactly. >> whatever you want to talk about it. >> the math doesn't work otherwise. >> i don't think it works. >> how is that going to go over with the tea party? >> paul ryan and others will not win this issue. >> here's a news flash. >> the elections have consequences. >> we just had this election. >> it's already starting 2016. >> we're already talking about 2016. >> marco rubio. >> chris christie is off and run running. >> you have been wearing that fleece a lot. >> i'm going to die in thi
, which is the party president morsi used to be a part of. the fact is in the end he is focused more on egypt's needs than necessarily hamas' needs. >> when we talk about the -- you're talking about the money, we're talking about what the u.s. gives, $2 billion annually, the imf has $4.8 billion in the reserve fund to help egypt and senator lindsey graham over the weekend was very forceful saying we are watching you. they know full well that aid will be cut off if they don't act accordingly trying to broker a peace deal, correct? >> i would say it's more than just trying to broker a peace deal. i think it's fulfilling its obligations. in the first sense its international obligations. one thing the president morsi understood is if hamas continued to do what it was doing and if the pressures on him led to him breaking the peace treaty with israel, then it wasn't just american assistance that would be put at risk. it would be all the assistance internationally. all the investment egypt would need. so he's putting egypt's needs first and foremost and that suggests that actually the econo
the world today. that does it for us tonight. we'll see you tomorrow night. it's thanks for being with us. >>> republicans are going to have to stop trying to sound moderate and reasonable because they are making rush limbaugh freak out. on second thought -- >> all hell broke lose on the republican side. >> republicans seem to be at a critical cross road. >> they are tripping over themselv themselves. >> there is no conservative movement. is rush limbaugh's country gone? >> yes. >> the horror. >> we have a cultural problem. >> why would so many republicans be upset about this? >> here's a news flash to the republicans. >> mitt romney was not our best candidate. >> well i am stunned. >> mitt romney, kick him when he's done. >> did you see the sunday shows yesterday? >> hitting their nominee. >> we have to show we're sere serious. we have to like them first. >> we would never talk like that. >> there's not a lot of people defending mitt romney. >> when you're in a hole, stop digging. he keeps digging. >> newt gingrich, i think it's nuts. >> they have to do something. >> we have the
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12